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Chaplain

US Navy servicemen receive support from Navy Chaplain.

Chaplain

Serve God and country as the spiritual guide and moral anchor for servicemembers of all backgrounds – even as you provide religious services to those within your own faith.

Serve God and country as the spiritual guide and moral anchor for servicemembers of all backgrounds – even as you provide religious services to those within your own faith.

“If God is calling you to a ministry that is active and lives day-to-day life with your people, there is no greater place in our country to do that than in the Navy.”
— Chaplain Justin Bernard, LT, USN
US Navy serviceman being Christened by Navy Chaplain.

About This Job

The Navy Chaplain Corps comprises more than 800 Navy Chaplains from more than 100 different faith groups, including Christian, Jewish, Muslim, Buddhist and many others. Each Chaplain is also a Navy Officer – meaning each holds an important leadership role.

Chaplains offer everything from faith leadership to personal advice to much-needed solace. All while living up to the guiding principles of the Chaplain Mission:

  • Providing religious ministry and support to those of your own faith
  • Facilitating the religious requirements of those from all faiths
  • Caring for all servicemembers and their families, including those subscribing to no specific faith
  • Advising the command in ensuring the free exercise of religion
LEARN MORE
part time
full time
Full Time
Part Time

As a Navy Chaplain, your job spans a broad range of duties, seeing people through some of their most joyful moments to their most personally challenging. And it could include any of these responsibilities:

  • Conduct worship services in a variety of settings
  • Perform religious rites and ceremonies such as weddings, funeral services and baptisms
  • Counsel individuals who seek guidance
  • Oversee religious education programs, such as Sunday school and youth groups
  • Visit and provide spiritual guidance and care to hospitalized personnel and/or their family members
  • Train lay leaders who conduct religious education programs
  • Promote attendance at religious services, retreats and conferences
  • Advise leaders at all levels regarding morale, ethics and spiritual well-being
Full Time
Part Time

Serving part-time as a Reservist, your duties will be carried out during your scheduled drilling and training periods. During monthly drilling, Chaplains in the Navy Reserve typically work at a location close to their homes. This gives you the flexibility to minister in the Navy while maintaining responsibilities to your congregation at home.

For Annual Training, Chaplains may serve anywhere in the world, alongside the Sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsmen to whom they minister.

Take a moment to learn more about the general roles and responsibilities of Reservists.

As a Chaplain in the Navy Reserve, RDML Gregory Horn works with his civilian parish and military ministry. What makes Navy Chaplaincy unique is the Ministry of Presence: Being where the people are when emotions run the gamut from triumph to tragedy allows him to make a bigger difference.

Full Time
Part Time

Most of what you do in the Navy Reserve is considered training. The basic Navy Reserve commitment involves training a minimum of one weekend a month (referred to as drilling) and two weeks a year (referred to as Annual Training) – or the equivalent of that.

Chaplains in the Navy Reserve serve in an Officer role. Before receiving the ongoing professional training that comes with this job, initial training requirements must be met.

For current or former Navy Officers (NAVET): Prior experience satisfies the initial leadership training requirement – so you will not need to go through Officer Training again.

For current or former Officers of military branches other than the Navy (OSVET), as well as for Officer candidates without prior military experience: You will need to meet the initial leadership training requirement by attending the 12-day Direct Commission Officer (DCO) School in Newport, R.I. This will count as your first Annual Training.

Full Time
Part Time

Navy Chaplains typically continue their education throughout their careers. Opportunities for continuing education are available through the funded Graduate Education Program while being paid full-time as a Navy Officer. Beyond professional credentials and certifications, Navy Chaplains can advance their education by:

Also keep in mind: If you’re in the process of starting or completing your graduate theological degree, you could potentially enter the Navy Chaplain Candidate Program (CCPO) as a student.

Full Time
Part Time

A graduate degree of not less than 72 semester hours in theological or related studies is required to work as a Navy Chaplain. Candidates seeking an Officer position in this community must also have a bachelor’s degree from a qualified educational institution and hold an ecclesiastical endorsement from a religious faith organization registered with the Department of Defense.

General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you’re currently serving, whether you’ve served before or whether you’ve never served before.

Connect with Navy Faith Leaders
ENJOY AN INCREDIBLE BENEFITS PACKAGE.
Paid training. Competitive salary. Comprehensive health coverage. Generous vacation. World travel. The list goes on.
US Navy servicemen raise US flag.
US Navy servicemen raise US flag.