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Mechanical & Industrial Technology

Navy machinery repairman repairs mechanical evaporator.

Mechanical & Industrial Technology

Overhauling engines. Repairing mechanical evaporators that turn seawater into freshwater. Troubleshooting systems on an F/A-18 Hornet. Without the skills of those working in the mechanical and industrial technology field, the Navy’s technologically advanced machinery and equipment would be little more than a mass of wires and metal.

Overhauling engines. Repairing mechanical evaporators that turn seawater into freshwater. Troubleshooting systems on an F/A-18 Hornet. Without the skills of those working in the mechanical and industrial technology field, the Navy’s technologically advanced machinery and equipment would be little more than a mass of wires and metal.

Technical and operational training and work in this field can often translate to credit hours toward a degree.
Navy machinist repairmen collaborate to fix machine.

About This Job

It’s a universal rule: Things break down. In the Navy, this requires skilled specialists to fix, replace and monitor a huge variety of machines, vehicles and systems. They are those who are called upon to keep everything safe and operational. All in order to keep America’s Navy on the move and functioning at the highest level.

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full time
Full Time
Part Time

Within Navy industrial and mechanical technology, there are distinct focus areas that have their own training paths and job descriptions.


 

Boatswain’s Mate (BM) – BMs repair, maintain and stow equipment in preparation for and during underway operations.

Engineman (EN) – ENs operate, service and repair internal combustion engines (usually diesel) on ships and small craft. They also operate and maintain refrigeration and air conditioning systems, air compressors, desalinization plants and small auxiliary boilers.

Gas Turbine Systems Technician, Mechanical (GSM) – GSMs operate, repair and maintain mechanical components of gas turbine engines, main propulsion machinery and auxiliary propulsion control systems.

Gunner’s Mate (GM) – GMs operate and maintain guided missile launching systems, gun mounts and other ordnance equipment, as well as small arms and magazines.

Hull Maintenance Technician (HT) – HTs perform metal work to keep shipboard structures and surfaces in good condition. They also maintain shipboard plumbing and marine sanitation systems and repair small boats.

Machinery Repairman (MR) – MRs operate machine tools to make replacement parts for ship engines and auxiliary systems. Also repair deck equipment including winches and hoists, condensers and heat exchange devices.

Machinist’s Mate (MM) – MMs operate and maintain steam turbines and gears for ship propulsion and auxiliary machinery. They also maintain electrohydraulic steering engines, refrigeration plants, air conditioning systems and desalinization plants.

Mineman (MN) – MNs assist in the detection and neutralization of underwater mines. They also test, assemble and maintain underwater explosive devices, and ensure proper repair and performance of the mine.

Full Time
Part Time

Serving part-time as a Reservist, your duties will be carried out during your scheduled drilling and training periods. During monthly drilling, Sailors in the Navy Reserve typically work at a location close to their homes.

For annual training, Sailors may serve anywhere in the world, whether on a ship at sea or bases and installations on shore.

Take a moment to learn more about the general roles and responsibilities of Reservists.

Full Time
Part Time

Most of what you do in the Navy Reserve is considered training. The basic Navy Reserve commitment involves training a minimum of one weekend a month (referred to as drilling) and two weeks a year (referred to as Annual Training) – or the equivalent of that.

Individuals in mechanical and industrial technology in the Navy Reserve serve in an Enlisted role. Before receiving the ongoing professional training that comes with the job, initial training requirements must be met.

For current or former military Enlisted servicemembers: Prior experience satisfies the initial Recruit Training requirement – so you will not need to go through Boot Camp again.

For those without prior military experience: You will need to meet the initial Recruit Training requirement by attending Boot Camp for seven to nine weeks in Great Lakes, Ill. This training course will prepare you for service in the Navy Reserve and count as your first Annual Training.

Full Time
Part Time

Beyond offering access to professional credentials and certifications, Navy technical and operational training can translate to credit hours toward a bachelor’s or associate degree through the American Council on Education. You may also continue your education through opportunities like the following:

Full Time
Part Time

A high school diploma or equivalent is required to become an Enlisted Sailor in the mechanical and industrial technology field in the Navy. Those seeking a position must be U.S. citizens. They should have an interest in machinery, mechanics and related skills.

General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you’re currently serving, whether you’ve served before or whether you’ve never served before.

ENJOY AN INCREDIBLE BENEFITS PACKAGE.
Paid training. Competitive salary. Comprehensive health coverage. Generous vacation. World travel. The list goes on.
US Navy servicemen raise US flag.
US Navy servicemen raise US flag.