More Information

Responsibilities

As an Intelligence Officer, you will take on a wide variety of assignments, each one essential in its related mission or objective. This role may include:

  • Leading the planning, development, testing and deployment of information systems crucial to the intelligence process
  • Monitoring and analyzing maritime activities that pose a threat to national security, such as drug smuggling, illegal immigration, arms transfers, environmental mishaps and violations of UN sanctions     
  • Delivering near-real-time operational intelligence assessment to high-level decision makers
  • Planning intelligence operations and managing intelligence programs
  • Enabling the collection of human intelligence
  • Leading teams of Enlisted experts who identify enemy targets for US or coalition forces
  • Overseeing the work of Intelligence Specialists – Enlisted Sailors (no degree required) who help convert information into intelligence

As an Intelligence Officer, you will take on a wide variety of assignments, each one essential in its related mission or objective. This role may include:

  • Leading the planning, development, testing and deployment of information systems crucial to the intelligence process
  • Monitoring and analyzing maritime activities that pose a threat to national security, such as drug smuggling, illegal immigration, arms transfers, environmental mishaps and violations of UN sanctions     
  • Delivering near-real-time operational intelligence assessment to high-level decision makers
  • Planning intelligence operations and managing intelligence programs
  • Enabling the collection of human intelligence
  • Leading teams of Enlisted experts who identify enemy targets for US or coalition forces
  • Overseeing the work of Intelligence Specialists – Enlisted Sailors (no degree required) who help convert information into intelligence

Work Environment

Depending on interests, background and performance, Intelligence Officers have opportunities to serve worldwide:

  • Aboard ships
  • On bases and installations
  • In assignments at Joint Intelligence Centers

Serving part-time as a Reservist, your duties will be carried out during your scheduled drilling and training periods. During monthly drilling, Intelligence Officers in the Navy Reserve typically work at a location close to their homes.

For annual training, they may serve anywhere in the world, either aboard ships or at facilities both home and abroad.

Take a moment to learn more about the general roles and responsibilities of Reservists.

Training & Advancement

Those pursuing an Intelligence Officer position are required to attend Officer Candidate School (OCS) in Newport, RI. Upon completion, they attend a five-month basic course of instruction at the Navy and Marine Corps Intelligence Training Center in Dam Neck, VA, where they receive training in: electronic, anti-submarine, anti-surface, anti-air, amphibious and strike warfare; counterintelligence; strategic intelligence; air defense analysis; and combat mission planning.

From there, INTEL Officers embark on a 30-month operational fleet tour. This is typically an assignment with an aviation squadron, with an air wing staff or onboard an aircraft carrier or amphibious command ship. Promotion opportunities are regularly available but competitive and based on performance. It’s also important to note that specialized training received and work experience gained in the course of service can lead to valuable credentialing and occupational opportunities in related fields.

Most of what you do in the Navy Reserve is considered training. The basic Navy Reserve commitment involves training a minimum of one weekend a month (referred to as drilling) and two weeks a year (referred to as Annual Training) – or the equivalent of that.

Intelligence Officers in the Navy Reserve serve in an Officer role. Before receiving the ongoing professional training that comes with this job, initial training requirements must be met.

For current or former Navy Officers (NAVET): Prior experience satisfies the initial leadership training requirement – so you will not need to go through Officer Training again.

For current or former Officers of military branches other than the Navy (OSVET), as well as for Officer candidates without prior military experience: Beginning October 1st, 2019, Officer Candidates will be required to attend the Officer Development School (ODS) in Newport, RI, instead of the 12-day Direct Commission Officer School. ODS is a five-week program that provides a comprehensive and intense introduction to the responsibilities of Navy Staff Corps Officers. Here you will learn about the military structure of the U.S. Navy, its rich history of traditions and customs, leadership development and military etiquette. There may be an option for attendees to request to split the five-week program into two sessions.

Education Opportunities

Beyond professional credentials and certifications, Intelligence Officers can advance their education by:

  • Pursuing opportunities at institutions such as Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) or Navy War College (NWC)
  • Completing Joint Professional Military Education (JPME) at one of the various service colleges

Beyond professional credentials and certifications, Intelligence Officers can advance their education by:

  • Pursuing opportunities at institutions such as Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) or Navy War College (NWC)
  • Completing Joint Professional Military Education (JPME) at one of the various service colleges

Qualifications & Requirements

A four-year degree from a regionally accredited institution is required to work as an Intelligence Officer. It is preferred that the degree focuses on areas of study such as: international relations, political science, government, engineering, physical science, natural science, computer science, or other academic fields related to intelligence.

All candidates must also be: US citizens; willing to serve worldwide; and eligible for a special intelligence security clearance.

General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you’re currently serving, whether you’ve served before or whether you’ve never served before.

A four-year degree from a regionally accredited institution is required to work as an Intelligence Officer. It is preferred that the degree focuses on areas of study such as: international relations, political science, government, engineering, physical science, natural science, computer science, or other academic fields related to intelligence.

All candidates must also be: US citizens; willing to serve worldwide; and eligible for a special intelligence security clearance.

General qualifications may vary depending upon whether you’re currently serving, whether you’ve served before or whether you’ve never served before.